Coldplay’s “Viva la Vida” Long Lives Its Life in the Music W

SAN DIEGO, Calif.
July 22, 2008
Melissa Frank

With such lyrics as “no I don’t want to battle from beginning to end, I don’t wanna cycle or recycle revenge, I don’t wanna follow death and all of his friends,” Coldplay’s new CD, “Viva la Vida or Death and All of His Friends,” certainly carries a different theme than their previous albums. Chris Martin’s electric voice chills all ears who listen to their new album.

+Hard Work at the Studio

Fans have anticipated the new CD since the success of their third album, “X&Y,” in 2005. “Viva la Vida,” their fourth and best album, has taken Coldplay hype to even greater heights. Although “Viva” has definitely shown that Coldplay can experiment with new types of sound, the album has in no way alienated fans.

+Original Sounds?

Many have compared the new CD to albums by Radiohead and U2, however those comments do not phase Coldplay. Their opening track, “Life in Technicolor,” is two and a half minutes of spine-tingling instrumental melodies.

+Melodic Voice

After touring the world and broadening the band’s success, Coldplay decided to experiment with different types of sound for their next album. However, many of the lyrics may confuse listeners; I’m confused as to whether he is encouraging peace or war in such songs as “Violet Hill” and “Lovers in Japan.”

+Buy the Album

Regardless of your opinions of Coldplay’s other albums, “Viva la Vida” is a bright addition to the music charts. This memorable album is a “must listen” for all music fans.

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